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Women left in pain from undiagnosed endometriosis

Wednesday, 6 September 2017  |  Editor

Women left in pain from undiagnosed endometriosis

Endometriosis is a painful disorder in which tissue that normally lines the uterus grows outside of it. 

Tens of thousands of women are being left in pain for years because doctors fail to spot a common condition, the NHS treatments watchdog has warned. There may also be other help available in the use of Colladeen.

The health service must take endometriosis more seriously, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) said as it published guidance on diagnosing and treating the condition. Women currently wait an average of seven-and-a-half years between first seeing a doctor and a firm diagnosis, it said. The condition, suffered by one in ten women of reproductive age, can cause chronic pain and infertility. Up to half of all women with infertility may have endometriosis, research has suggested, which occurs when tissue that behaves like the lining of the womb is found elsewhere in the body. It costs the UK economy £8.2 billion a year in treatment and loss of work.

Mark Barber, director of the centre for guidelines at Nice, said: “Once it has been diagnosed there are effective treatments that can ease women’s symptoms.”

Daisy Ridley, who starred in Star Wars: The Force Awakens, has spoken about coping with the condition Daisy Ridley urges women to listen to their bodies after revealing her ongoing struggle with endometriosis and subsequent acne that has left her confidence in 'tatters’. She explained that she was 15 when she diagnosed with endometriosis, a disorder in which tissue that normally lines the uterus grows outside of it. 

'To any of you who are suffering with anything, go to a doctor; pay for a specialist; get your hormones tested, get allergy testing; keep on top of how your body is feeling and don't worry about sounding like a hypochondriac,' she wrote. 

Alongside that advice, consider whether nutrition can play a part in helping alleviate the symptoms of endometriosis. 

One particularly effective natural treatment has been shown to be helpful. Regular use of Colladeen is known to block the release of specific prostaglandins, chemicals the body makes during attacks of painful periods (dysmenorrhea) and as part of the general inflammatory response. For this reason, endometriosis sufferers will frequently use Colladeen as an adjunct to their health programmes.


Lamberts Colladeen Maximum Strength

As a supportive regime for endometriosis

Regular use of Colladeen is known to block the release of specific prostaglandins, chemicals the body makes during attacks of painful periods (dysmenorrhea) and as part of the general inflammatory response. For this reason, endometriosis sufferers will frequently use Colladeen as an adjunct to their supplement programmes.