New Products
Nutri Advanced Bright Kids Jelly Splats

Nutri Advanced Bright Kids Jelly Splats£13.94

Eskimo Bright Kids Jelly Splats is Nutri's exciting new omega-3 fish oil designed specifically for kids. Each jelly tab, or ‘splat’ tastes great, is easy to take and provides 250mg of DHA which supports healthy brain function.


Biocare Children's Red Berry BioMelts - 28 Sachets

Biocare Children's Red Berry BioMelts - 28 Sachets£17.95

Live bacteria with vitamin D. Flavoured for children


NEW
Higher Nature Vitality (155g)

Higher Nature Vitality (155g)£9.95

For healthy joints and muscles
A complete formula to keep your cats and dogs flexible and active.


Nutri Advanced Metaclear

Nutri Advanced Metaclear£36.74

Over 30 different vitamins, minerals, plant extracts and choline for normal liver function.


A Vogel Echinaforce Echinacea Hot Drink with Elderberry 100ml

A Vogel Echinaforce Echinacea Hot Drink with Elderberry 100ml£8.99

For symptoms of the common cold and influenza type infections.

Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA)

SIGN UP for free newsletters an make sure you are kept up to date with new health articles (and get 20% of your first order for health supplements).


Also Known as Peripheral Vascular Disease, Aneurysm, Buerger’s Disease, Chronic Thromboangiitis, Occlusive Arterial Disease.

Keep blood flowing freely through your legs and other parts of your body. According to research or other evidence, the following self-care steps may be helpful.


Supplements that may be helpful for AAA:

Vitamin B3 may help prevent and treat skin ulcers caused by peripheral vascular disease.

Folic Acid. As with other vascular diseases, people with thromboangiitis obliterans are more likely to have low levels of folic acid. Supplementing with folic acid may help correct a deficiency.


What is Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA)

This is a swelling (aneurysm) of the aorta – the main blood vessel that leads away from the heart, down through the abdomen to the rest of the body.

The abdominal aorta is the largest blood vessel in the body and is usually around 2cm wide – roughly the width of a garden hose. However, it can swell to over 5.5cm – what doctors class as a large AAA.

Large aneurysms are rare, but can be very serious. If a large aneurysm bursts, it causes huge internal bleeding and is usually fatal.

The bulging occurs when the wall of the aorta weakens. Although what causes this weakness is unclear, smoking and high blood pressure are thought to increase the risk of an aneurysm.

AAAs are most common in men aged over 65. A rupture accounts for more than 1 in 50 of all deaths in this group and a total of 6,000 deaths in England and Wales each year.

This is why all men are invited for a screening test when they turn 65. The test involves a simple ultrasound scan, which takes around 10-15 minutes.

Symptoms of an AAA

In most cases, an AAA causes no noticeable symptoms. However, if it becomes large, some people may develop a pain or a pulsating feeling in their abdomen (tummy) or persistent back pain.

An AAA doesn’t usually pose a serious threat to health, but there’s a risk that a larger aneurysm could burst (rupture).

A ruptured aneurysm can cause massive internal bleeding, which is usually fatal. Around 8 out of 10 people with a rupture either die before they reach hospital or don’t survive surgery.

The most common symptom of a ruptured aortic aneurysm is sudden and severe pain in the abdomen.

If you suspect that you or someone else has had a ruptured aneurysm, call 999 immediately and ask for an ambulance.

Causes of an AAA

It's not known exactly what causes the aortic wall to weaken, although increasing age and being male are known to be the biggest risk factors.

There are other risk factors you can do something about, including smoking and having high blood pressure and cholesterol level.

Having a family history of aortic aneurysms also means that you have an increased risk of developing one yourself.

Diagnosing an AAA

Because AAAs usually cause no symptoms, they tend to be diagnosed either as a result of screening or during a routine examination – for example, if a GP notices a pulsating sensation in your abdomen.

The screening test is an ultrasound scan, which allows the size of your abdominal aorta to be measured on a monitor. This is also how an aneurysm will be diagnosed if your doctor suspects you have one.

Treating an AAA

If a large AAA is detected before it ruptures, most people will be advised to have treatment, to prevent it rupturing.

This is usually done with surgery to replace the weakened section of the blood vessel with a piece of synthetic tubing.

If surgery is not advisable – or if you decide not to have it – there are a number of non-surgical treatments that can reduce the risk of an aneurysm rupturing.

They include medications to lower your cholesterol and blood pressure, and quitting smoking.

You will also have the size of your aneurysm checked regularly with ultrasound scanning.

Preventing an AAA

The best way to prevent getting an aneurysm – or reduce the risk of an aneurysm growing bigger and possibly rupturing – is to avoid anything that could damage your blood vessels, such as:

  • smoking
  • eating a high-fat diet
  • not exercising regularly
  • being overweight or obese

Screening

Men who are 65 and over are offered a screening test to check if they have an AAA.

All men in England are invited for screening in the year they turn 65.

Men who are over 65 and have not previously been screened can request a screening test by contacting their local AAA screening service directly.

Women and men under 65 are not invited for screening.

However, if you feel you have an increased risk of having an AAA, talk to your GP who can still refer you for a scan.

 

1. Aorta

2. Heart

3. Aortic aneurysm

4. Aorta leading away form the heart

5. kidney